Getting to know your club members #3 – Juanita

Athlete Profiles

Name Juanita Koschier
Weapon Epée
Hand Right
Age 19

1. When did you start fencing?

Since the age of 12, I have trained at the UTS Fencing Club, I began learning foil for four years until I switched discipline in 2016 and transferred to ​Epée.

2. What was your most difficult moment in fencing and why?

My most difficult moment in Fencing was when I was first starting out as a foilist, after four years of training I was not enjoying foil as much as I thought I would. It wasn’t until I made a spur of the moment decision in 2016 and transferred to ​Épée ​that I started to train more regularly.

3. What was your proudest fencing moment and why?

My most memorable experience from fencing would be from three years ago. For many years I dreamt of winning a gold medal, however year after year, my ranks were quite low, nevertheless I promised to myself to continue training. It wasn’t until the day that I came first in New Caledonia that I realised my success was a group effort, my teammates and coaches supported us during competitions which helped us reach our goals and achieve a team Bronze medal for Australia.

4. Favourite fencing food

My favourite fencing food is snacking on small pieces of 70% Cocoa Lind dark chocolate during competitions.

5. How do you keep yourself motivated

As a full time student juggling work commitments, it is important that I manage my time effectively so that I can harness my full potential.

Getting to know your club members #2 – Dominic

Athlete Profiles:

Name Dominic Au-Yeung
Weapon Sabre
Hand Left
Age 21

1.    When did you start fencing?

I started fencing when I was 9-years old and joined UTS Fencing Club’s Musketeers Program for Junior fencers. The first time I saw fencing was on TV for an advertisement and I think it was the all-white outfit and mask that really got me curious.

2.    What was your most difficult moment in fencing and why?

I didn’t know it back then, but I think losing the drive and purpose to fence when I was around 15-16. I was doing foil at the time and I wasn’t very good at it which didn’t really help. I was very casual in my former years so to pick up the discipline for it later on was quite difficult.

After starting university at UTS and going to O’Day I saw that fencing was still going and I decided to go back and give it another go. Best decision I’ve made in a long time!! 😉

3.    What was your proudest fencing moment and why?

I think coming back and really putting in the work to become successful in the sport. Especially after starting a new weapon, not retaining a lot of my previous ability and competing with athletes who have been doing this since they were young too, it was hard for me to find my feet in the beginning. Luckily for me, with the guidance of both the Club President, Melissa and my coach, Min I was able to compete on a very high level within 2 years of my return. My best National result so far is earning a Bronze Medal at the men’s U23 Sabre Championships and seeded first after pools.

I’m also happy to have put fencing on the map at UTS Sport, after winning the individual and team sabre events at the Unisport Nationals Div 1 (Unigames). UTS Sport has supported many of our fencing athletes and I’m proud to have earned the 2020 Elite Athlete Program Scholarship as well as joining the U23 Australia Fencing Team.

I’m still finding new challenges every day and always setting new goals to achieve for the year. A lot of those goals have been put on hold due to COVID-19 but I’m keen to continue to pursue them during late 2020 and 2021. My next big competition I’m hoping to compete in is the U23 Asian Fencing Championships in Taipei. Fingers Crossed!!

4.    Favourite fencing food?

I almost always pack gummy bears, bananas or any other low GI carb so that I can quickly eat and gain energy throughout a long competition day. It’s important eat and stay hydrated throughout a competition because most fencers won’t realise how much energy or sweat, they’ve lost after a few bouts.

5.    How do you keep yourself motivated?

It’s important for me to breakdown my larger goals into smaller goals that can be frequently achieved. When I came back to fencing in 2018, one of my main goals was to win a medal at a competition. At the time it was a very big objective as I haven’t won any individual medal at state or national level yet. I broke this down to more achievable goals such as frequently coming to training and going to competitions to gain experience. When things are done enough times, it becomes a habit. Prior to COVID-19 I spent at least 3-5 days fencing and 2 days at the gym. Seeing the results of my hard work turning into accomplishments keeps me motivated to do more.

Global Experience – Fencing exercise and tips #2

This week we have two new links for you – firstly, a comprehensive fencing fitness piece by a strength and conditioning coach who works with fencers on the US National team, and secondly a series of agility exercises perfect for kids (and others!)


Strength and Conditioning for Fencing

https://www.stack.com/a/8-keys-to-a-successful-fencing-training-program


Agility fencing exercises for kids

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1evKP3reCnA​